Full list of publications available from PubMed here

Selected publications

Review

  • Species-conserved SYNGAP1 phenotypes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.
    Mol Cell Neurosci Kilinc, M. et al.

Basic Research

  • SYNGAP1 heterozygosity disrupts sensory processing by reducing touch-related activity within somatosensory cortex circuits.
    Nat Neurosci Michaelson, S. D. et al.

  • Re-expression of SynGAP protein in adulthood improves translatable measures of brain function and behavior.
    Elife Creson, T. K. et al.

  • Pathogenic SYNGAP1 mutations impair cognitive development by disrupting maturation of dendritic spine synapses.
    Cell Clement, J. P. et al.

Assay Development

  • An interactive framework for whole-brain maps at cellular resolution.
    Nat Neurosci Furth, D. et al.

  • A Simple Procedure for Creating Scalable Phenotypic Screening Assays in Human Neurons.
    Sci Rep Sridharan, B. et al.



Publications by date:

2019

1 Sridharan, B. et al. A Simple Procedure for Creating Scalable Phenotypic Screening Assays in Human Neurons. Sci Rep 9, 9000, doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45265-1 (2019).

2 Sillivan, S. E., Jones, M. E., Jamieson, S., Rumbaugh, G. & Miller, C. A. Bioinformatic analysis of long-lasting transcriptional and translational changes in the basolateral amygdala following acute stress. PLoS One 14, e0209846, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0209846 (2019).

3 Sillivan, S. E. et al. MicroRNA regulation of persistent stress-enhanced memory. Mol Psychiatry, doi:10.1038/s41380-019-0432-2 (2019).

4 Sillivan, S. E. et al. Correction: MicroRNA regulation of persistent stress-enhanced memory. Mol Psychiatry, doi:10.1038/s41380-019-0452-y (2019).

5 Radnai, L., Stremel, R. F., Sellers, J. R., Rumbaugh, G. & Miller, C. A. A Semi-High-Throughput Adaptation of the NADH-Coupled ATPase Assay for Screening Small Molecule Inhibitors. J Vis Exp, doi:10.3791/60017 (2019).

6 Jones, M. E., Sillivan, S. E., Jamieson, S., Rumbaugh, G. & Miller, C. A. microRNA mir-598-3p mediates susceptibility to stress enhancement of remote fear memory. Learn Mem 26, 363-372, doi:10.1101/lm.048827.118 (2019).

7 Gripp, K. W. et al. The sixth international RASopathies symposium: Precision medicine-From promise to practice. Am J Med Genet A, doi:10.1002/ajmg.a.61434 (2019).

8 Creson, T. K. et al. Re-expression of SynGAP protein in adulthood improves translatable measures of brain function and behavior. Elife 8, doi:10.7554/eLife.46752 (2019).

9 Blouin, A. M. et al. Social stress-potentiated methamphetamine seeking. Addict Biol 24, 958-968, doi:10.1111/adb.12666 (2019).

2018

10 Weldon, M., Kilinc, M., Lloyd Holder, J., Jr. & Rumbaugh, G. The first international conference on SYNGAP1-related brain disorders: a stakeholder meeting of families, researchers, clinicians, and regulators. J Neurodev Disord 10, 6, doi:10.1186/s11689-018-9225-1 (2018).

11 Wang, W. et al. Atypical Endocannabinoid Signaling Initiates a New Form of Memory-Related Plasticity at a Cortical Input to Hippocampus. Cereb Cortex 28, 2253-2266, doi:10.1093/cercor/bhx126 (2018).

12 Spicer, T. P. et al. Improved Scalability of Neuron-Based Phenotypic Screening Assays for Therapeutic Discovery in Neuropsychiatric Disorders. Mol Neuropsychiatry 3, 141-150, doi:10.1159/000481731 (2018).

13 Michaelson, S. D. et al. SYNGAP1 heterozygosity disrupts sensory processing by reducing touch-related activity within somatosensory cortex circuits. Nat Neurosci 21, 1-13, doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0268-0 (2018).

14 Kilinc, M. et al. Species-conserved SYNGAP1 phenotypes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Mol Cell Neurosci 91, 140-150, doi:10.1016/j.mcn.2018.03.008 (2018).

15 Furth, D. et al. An interactive framework for whole-brain maps at cellular resolution. Nat Neurosci 21, 139-149, doi:10.1038/s41593-017-0027-7 (2018).

16 Furth, D. et al. Publisher Correction: An interactive framework for whole-brain maps at cellular resolution. Nat Neurosci 21, 895, doi:10.1038/s41593-017-0058-0 (2018).

17 Briggs, S. B., Hafenbreidel, M., Young, E. J., Rumbaugh, G. & Miller, C. A. The role of nonmuscle myosin II in polydrug memories and memory reconsolidation. Learn Mem 25, 391-398, doi:10.1101/lm.046763.117 (2018).

2017

18 Young, E. J., Briggs, S. B., Rumbaugh, G. & Miller, C. A. Nonmuscle myosin II inhibition disrupts methamphetamine-associated memory in females and adolescents. Neurobiol Learn Mem 139, 109-116, doi:10.1016/j.nlm.2017.01.001 (2017).

19 Sillivan, S. E. et al. Susceptibility and Resilience to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-like Behaviors in Inbred Mice. Biol Psychiatry 82, 924-933, doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.06.030 (2017).

20 Briggs, S. B., Blouin, A. M., Young, E. J., Rumbaugh, G. & Miller, C. A. Memory disrupting effects of nonmuscle myosin II inhibition depend on the class of abused drug and brain region. Learn Mem 24, 70-75, doi:10.1101/lm.043976.116 (2017).

2016

21 Young, E. J. et al. Nonmuscle myosin IIB as a therapeutic target for the prevention of relapse to methamphetamine use. Mol Psychiatry 21, 615-623, doi:10.1038/mp.2015.103 (2016).

22 Ogden, K. K., Ozkan, E. D. & Rumbaugh, G. Prioritizing the development of mouse models for childhood brain disorders. Neuropharmacology 100, 2-16, doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2015.07.029 (2016).

2015

23 Zhou, M. et al. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment. Brain 138, 992-1008, doi:10.1093/brain/awv002 (2015).

24 Rumbaugh, G. et al. Pharmacological Selectivity Within Class I Histone Deacetylases Predicts Effects on Synaptic Function and Memory Rescue. Neuropsychopharmacology 40, 2307-2316, doi:10.1038/npp.2015.93 (2015).

25 Ozkan, E. D. et al. Input-specific regulation of hippocampal circuit maturation by non-muscle myosin IIB. J Neurochem 134, 429-444, doi:10.1111/jnc.13146 (2015).

26 Aceti, M. et al. Syngap1 haploinsufficiency damages a postnatal critical period of pyramidal cell structural maturation linked to cortical circuit assembly. Biol Psychiatry 77, 805-815, doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.08.001 (2015).

2014

27 Young, E. J. et al. Selective, retrieval-independent disruption of methamphetamine-associated memory by actin depolymerization. Biol Psychiatry 75, 96-104, doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.07.036 (2014).

28 Ozkan, E. D. et al. Reduced cognition in Syngap1 mutants is caused by isolated damage within developing forebrain excitatory neurons. Neuron 82, 1317-1333, doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2014.05.015 (2014).

29 Aguilar-Valles, A. et al. Methamphetamine-associated memory is regulated by a writer and an eraser of permissive histone methylation. Biol Psychiatry 76, 57-65, doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.09.014 (2014).

2013

30 Lynch, G., Kramar, E. A., Babayan, A. H., Rumbaugh, G. & Gall, C. M. Differences between synaptic plasticity thresholds result in new timing rules for maximizing long-term potentiation. Neuropharmacology 64, 27-36, doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2012.07.006 (2013).

31 Griggs, E. M., Young, E. J., Rumbaugh, G. & Miller, C. A. MicroRNA-182 regulates amygdala-dependent memory formation. J Neurosci 33, 1734-1740, doi:10.1523/jneurosci.2873-12.2013 (2013).

32 Clement, J. P., Ozkan, E. D., Aceti, M., Miller, C. A. & Rumbaugh, G. SYNGAP1 links the maturation rate of excitatory synapses to the duration of critical-period synaptic plasticity. J Neurosci 33, 10447-10452, doi:10.1523/jneurosci.0765-13.2013 (2013).

33 Almonte, A. G. et al. Protease-activated receptor-1 modulates hippocampal memory formation and synaptic plasticity. J Neurochem 124, 109-122, doi:10.1111/jnc.12075 (2013).

2012

34 Kramar, E. A. et al. Synaptic evidence for the efficacy of spaced learning. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109, 5121-5126, doi:10.1073/pnas.1120700109 (2012).

35 Gavin, C. F., Rubio, M. D., Young, E., Miller, C. & Rumbaugh, G. Myosin II motor activity in the lateral amygdala is required for fear memory consolidation. Learn Mem 19, 9-14, doi:10.1101/lm.024042.111 (2012).

36 Clement, J. P. et al. Pathogenic SYNGAP1 mutations impair cognitive development by disrupting maturation of dendritic spine synapses. Cell 151, 709-723, doi:10.1016/j.cell.2012.08.045 (2012).

2011

37 Rumbaugh, G. & Miller, C. A. Epigenetic changes in the brain: measuring global histone modifications. Methods Mol Biol 670, 263-274, doi:10.1007/978-1-60761-744-0_18 (2011).

38 Rubio, M. D., Johnson, R., Miller, C. A., Huganir, R. L. & Rumbaugh, G. Regulation of synapse structure and function by distinct myosin II motors. J Neurosci 31, 1448-1460, doi:10.1523/jneurosci.3294-10.2011 (2011).

2010

39 Rex, C. S. et al. Myosin IIb regulates actin dynamics during synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Neuron 67, 603-617, doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2010.07.016 (2010).

40 Miller, C. A. et al. Cortical DNA methylation maintains remote memory. Nat Neurosci 13, 664-666, doi:10.1038/nn.2560 (2010).

41 Kilgore, M. et al. Inhibitors of class 1 histone deacetylases reverse contextual memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Neuropsychopharmacology 35, 870-880, doi:10.1038/npp.2009.197 (2010).

2009

42 Guo, X. et al. Reduced expression of the NMDA receptor-interacting protein SynGAP causes behavioral abnormalities that model symptoms of Schizophrenia. Neuropsychopharmacology 34, 1659-1672, doi:10.1038/npp.2008.223 (2009).

43 Funk, A. J., Rumbaugh, G., Harotunian, V., McCullumsmith, R. E. & Meador-Woodruff, J. H. Decreased expression of NMDA receptor-associated proteins in frontal cortex of elderly patients with schizophrenia. Neuroreport 20, 1019-1022, doi:10.1097/WNR.0b013e32832d30d9 (2009).

2008

44 Heine, M. et al. Surface mobility of postsynaptic AMPARs tunes synaptic transmission. Science 320, 201-205, doi:10.1126/science.1152089 (2008).

2007

45 Wu, Y. et al. Mutations in ionotropic AMPA receptor 3 alter channel properties and are associated with moderate cognitive impairment in humans. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104, 18163-18168, doi:10.1073/pnas.0708699104 (2007).

46 Sia, G. M. et al. Interaction of the N-terminal domain of the AMPA receptor GluR4 subunit with the neuronal pentraxin NP1 mediates GluR4 synaptic recruitment. Neuron 55, 87-102, doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2007.06.020 (2007).

2006

47 Shepherd, J. D. et al. Arc/Arg3.1 mediates homeostatic synaptic scaling of AMPA receptors. Neuron 52, 475-484, doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2006.08.034 (2006).

48 Rumbaugh, G., Adams, J. P., Kim, J. H. & Huganir, R. L. SynGAP regulates synaptic strength and mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured neurons. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103, 4344-4351, doi:10.1073/pnas.0600084103 (2006).

2005

49 Thomas, G. M., Rumbaugh, G. R., Harrar, D. B. & Huganir, R. L. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 interacts with and phosphorylates PDZ domain-containing proteins and regulates AMPA receptor transmission. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102, 15006-15011, doi:10.1073/pnas.0507476102 (2005).

50 Rumbaugh, G. Synapses fight over glutamate receptor 1. J Neurosci 25, 8347-8348, doi:10.1523/jneurosci.3209-05.2005 (2005).

51 Hayashi, T., Rumbaugh, G. & Huganir, R. L. Differential regulation of AMPA receptor subunit trafficking by palmitoylation of two distinct sites. Neuron 47, 709-723, doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2005.06.035 (2005).

2004

52 Landree, L. E. et al. C75, a fatty acid synthase inhibitor, modulates AMP-activated protein kinase to alter neuronal energy metabolism. J Biol Chem 279, 3817-3827, doi:10.1074/jbc.M310991200 (2004).

2003

53 Tao, Y. X. et al. Impaired NMDA receptor-mediated postsynaptic function and blunted NMDA receptor-dependent persistent pain in mice lacking postsynaptic density-93 protein. J Neurosci 23, 6703-6712 (2003).

54 Rumbaugh, G., Sia, G. M., Garner, C. C. & Huganir, R. L. Synapse-associated protein-97 isoform-specific regulation of surface AMPA receptors and synaptic function in cultured neurons. J Neurosci 23, 4567-4576 (2003).

55 Lee, H. K. et al. Phosphorylation of the AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit is required for synaptic plasticity and retention of spatial memory. Cell 112, 631-643, doi:10.1016/s0092-8674(03)00122-3 (2003).

2001

56 Ceccon, M., Rumbaugh, G. & Vicini, S. Distinct effect of pregnenolone sulfate on NMDA receptor subtypes. Neuropharmacology 40, 491-500, doi:10.1016/s0028-3908(00)00197-0 (2001).

2000

57 Vicini, S. & Rumbaugh, G. A slow NMDA channel: in search of a role. J Physiol 525 Pt 2, 283, doi:10.1111/j.0021-3751.2000.00283.x (2000).

58 Rumbaugh, G., Prybylowski, K., Wang, J. F. & Vicini, S. Exon 5 and spermine regulate deactivation of NMDA receptor subtypes. J Neurophysiol 83, 1300-1306, doi:10.1152/jn.2000.83.3.1300 (2000).

59 Prybylowski, K., Rumbaugh, G., Wolfe, B. B. & Vicini, S. Increased exon 5 expression alters extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cerebellar neurons. J Neurochem 75, 1140-1146, doi:10.1046/j.1471-4159.2000.0751140.x (2000).

1999

60 Rumbaugh, G. & Vicini, S. Distinct synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in developing cerebellar granule neurons. J Neurosci 19, 10603-10610 (1999).